September 19, 2013

PASTA! Who doesnt like Pasta? Part II

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In January 2011 I posted an opinion article titled "Pasta! Who doesnt like Pasta?" In this article/opinion piece I named Dr. Schar as being the 5+ star winner. Well folks, I have a new one!


I found Jovial at my local Jimbos market and realized I had never tried it. Mind you, this was in 2012 that I found it and now I decided to blog about it :)

Jovial is made of organic brown rice flour and water. That's it! You probably think that it cant be that great, but let me tell you, this is now the only pasta we eat in our house. They have several different brown rice types to choose from...
  • Spaghetti
  • Capellini
  • Penne Rigate
  • Fusilli
  • Caserecce
  • Lasagna
  • Tagliatelle (my favorite when making stroganoff. This is made with Organic brown rice flour and organic eggs)
Texture and taste is amazing. This is another pasta no one call tell is gluten free unless you notice the color. I would always follow the instructions on the box when cooking gluten free pastas. The instructions are there for a reason right?

Again, if you have a gluten free pasta, I didn't mention in this or the other article, that you like, fill me in please. I would love to hear about it.

Mangia bene, vivi felice! Buon appetito!

This is too funny! I was just sitting reading SELF magazine from June 2013 and Jovial was voted the Best Gluten Free Pasta for the 2013 healthy food awards. Pretty cool huh?

Happy eating (gluten free pasta), learning and living! Gluten Free...

Plant Protien in Wine Making

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The use of wheat protein (hydrolyzed wheat gluten) and pea protein (isolate) as a processing aid in wine making.These proteins are used in powder or aqueous (of relating or resembling water) form.

The use of these plant proteins is exempt from the premarket approval requirements of the FDA because they have determined such use is "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) through scientific procedures.

REASON: To remove the harsh, bitter tannin material in wine by forming a insoluble protien-tannin complex which precipitates from wine

Protein "fining" treatment is applied to clarify wine and to reduce astringency. In this process, tannin natural to grapes and wine, which is responsible for astringency and haze in beverages including wine and beer, interact with "fining" proteins to form an insoluble complex which precipitates from wine.

I found the above information here.

If I understand this correctly they add the protein which draws all the tannin together for easy removal to "clarify" the wine?

So, the question is, are manufacturers labeling their products gluten free or not? This remains to be seen. If you read my article Gluten Free = less than 20ppm you will read the following... "The agency may reevaluate the 20 ppm standard as new information becomes available. FDA plans to issue a proposed rule to address how it will assess compliance with this final rule with respect to fermented or hydrolyzed foods or ingredients, for which there are no scientifically valid methods for detecting intact gluten proteins. Also, FDA intends to work with USDA and TTB on the issue of gluten-free food labeling to harmonize requirements for food products regulated by these agencies, where possible."

The final rule has not been ruled upon and Im not sure if and when that will happen. I thought wine was safe and gluten free, but after reading this I'm not so sure! I guess stay with the beverages that state "gluten free" on the label like Widers Pear Cider.

Till next time. Happy eating, learning and living! Gluten Free...

Natural Flavorings... Gluten Free?

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According to the FDA the term "natural flavor" or "natural flavoring" means the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof, whose significant function in food is flavoring rather than nutritional. Natural flavors include the natural essence or extractives obtained from plants listed in 182.10, 182.20, 182.40, and 182.50 and part 184 of this chapter, and the substances listed in 172.510 of this chapter.
Sec. 182.10 Spices and other natural seasonings and flavorings.
Spices and other natural seasonings and flavorings that are generally recognized as safe for their intended use, within the meaning of section 409 of the Act, are as follows:
Common name Botanical name of plant source
Alfalfa herb and seed Medicago sativa L.
Allspice Pimenta officinalis Lindl.
Ambrette seed Hibiscus abelmoschus L.
Angelica Angelica archangelica L. or other spp. of Angelica.
Angelica root Do.
Angelica seed Do.
Angostura (cusparia bark) Galipea officinalis Hancock.
Anise Pimpinella anisum L.
Anise, star Illicium verum Hook. f.
Balm (lemon balm) Melissa officinalis L.
Basil, bush Ocimum minimum L.
Basil, sweet Ocimum basilicum L.
Bay Laurus nobilis L.
Calendula Calendula officinalis L.
Camomile (chamomile), English or Roman Anthemis nobilis L.
Camomile (chamomile), German or Hungarian Matricaria chamomilla L.
Capers Capparis spinosa L.
Capsicum Capsicum frutescens L. or Capsicum annuum L.
Caraway Carum carvi L.
Caraway, black (black cumin) Nigella sativa L.
Cardamom (cardamon) Elettaria cardamomum Maton.
Cassia, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume.
Cassia, Padang or Batavia Cinnamomum burmanni Blume.
Cassia, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees.
Cayenne pepper Capsicum frutescens L. or Capsicum annuum L.
Celery seed Apium graveolens L.
Chervil Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm.
Chives Allium schoenoprasum L.
Cinnamon, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees.
Cinnamon, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume.
Cinnamon, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees.
Clary (clary sage) Salvia sclarea L.
Clover Trifolium spp.
Coriander Coriandrum sativum L.
Cumin (cummin) Cuminum cyminum L.
Cumin, black (black caraway) Nigella sativa L.
Elder flowers Sambucus canadensis L.
Fennel, common Foeniculum vulgare Mill.
Fennel, sweet (finocchio, Florence fennel) Foeniculum vulgare Mill. var. duice (DC.) Alex.
Fenugreek Trigonella foenum-graecum L.
Galanga (galangal) Alpinia officinarum Hance.
Geranium Pelargonium spp.
Ginger Zingiber officinale Rosc.
Grains of paradise Amomum melegueta Rosc.
Horehound (hoarhound) Marrubium vulgare L.
Horseradish Armoracia lapathifolia Gilib.
Hyssop Hyssopus officinalis L.
Lavender Lavandula officinalis Chaix.
Linden flowers Tilia spp.
Mace Myristica fragrans Houtt.
Marigold, pot Calendula officinalis L.
Marjoram, pot Majorana onites (L.) Benth.
Marjoram, sweet Majorana hortensis Moench.
Mustard, black or brown Brassica nigra (L.) Koch.
Mustard, brown Brassica juncea (L.) Coss.
Mustard, white or yellow Brassica hirta Moench.
Nutmeg Myristica fragrans Houtt.
Oregano (oreganum, Mexican oregano, Mexican sage, origan) Lippia spp.
Paprika Capsicum annuum L.
Parsley Petroselinum crispum (Mill.) Mansf.
Pepper, black Piper nigrum L.
Pepper, cayenne Capsicum frutescens L. or Capsicum annuum L.
Pepper, red Do.
Pepper, white Piper nigrum L.
Peppermint Mentha piperita L.
Poppy seed Papayer somniferum L.
Pot marigold Calendula officinalis L.
Pot marjoram Majorana onites (L.) Benth.
Rosemary Rosmarinus officinalis L.
Saffron Crocus sativus L.
Sage Salvia officinalis L.
Sage, Greek Salvia triloba L.
Savory, summer Satureia hortensis L. (Satureja).
Savory, winter Satureia montana L. (Satureja).
Sesame Sesamum indicum L.
Spearmint Mentha spicata L.
Star anise Illicium verum Hook. f.
Tarragon Artemisia dracunculus L.
Thyme Thymus vulgaris L.
Thyme, wild or creeping Thymus serpyllum L.
Turmeric Curcuma longa L.
Vanilla Vanilla planifolia Andr. or Vanilla tahitensis J. W. Moore.
Zedoary Curcuma zedoaria Rosc.
Sec. 182.20 Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates).
Essential oils, oleoresins (solvent-free), and natural extractives (including distillates) that are generally recognized as safe for their intended use, within the meaning of section 409 of the Act, are as follows:
Common name Botanical name of plant source
Alfalfa Medicago sativa L.
Allspice Pimenta officinalis Lindl.
Almond, bitter (free from prussic acid) Prunus amygdalus Batsch, Prunus armeniaca L., or Prunus persica (L.) Batsch.
Ambrette (seed) Hibiscus moschatus Moench.
Angelica root Angelica archangelica L.
Angelica seed Do.
Angelica stem Do.
Angostura (cusparia bark) Galipea officinalis Hancock.
Anise Pimpinella anisum L.
Asafetida Ferula assa-foetida L. and related spp. of Ferula.
Balm (lemon balm) Melissa officinalis L.
Balsam of Peru Myroxylon pereirae Klotzsch.
Basil Ocimum basilicum L.
Bay leaves Laurus nobilis L.
Bay (myrcia oil) Pimenta racemosa (Mill.) J. W. Moore.
Bergamot (bergamot orange) Citrus aurantium L. subsp. bergamia Wright et Arn.
Bitter almond (free from prussic acid) Prunus amygdalus Batsch, Prunus armeniaca L., or Prunus persica (L.) Batsch.
Bois de rose Aniba rosaeodora Ducke.
Cacao Theobroma cacao L.
Camomile (chamomile) flowers, Hungarian Matricaria chamomilla L.
Camomile (chamomile) flowers, Roman or English Anthemis nobilis L.
Cananga Cananga odorata Hook. f. and Thoms.
Capsicum Capsicum frutescens L. and Capsicum annuum L.
Caraway Carum carvi L.
Cardamom seed (cardamon) Elettaria cardamomum Maton.
Carob bean Ceratonia siliqua L.
Carrot Daucus carota L.
Cascarilla bark Croton eluteria Benn.
Cassia bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume.
Cassia bark, Padang or Batavia Cinnamomum burmanni Blume.
Cassia bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees.
Celery seed Apium graveolens L.
Cherry, wild, bark Prunus serotina Ehrh.
Chervil Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm.
Chicory Cichorium intybus L.
Cinnamon bark, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees.
Cinnamon bark, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume.
Cinnamon bark, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees.
Cinnamon leaf, Ceylon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees.
Cinnamon leaf, Chinese Cinnamomum cassia Blume.
Cinnamon leaf, Saigon Cinnamomum loureirii Nees.
Citronella Cymbopogon nardus Rendle.
Citrus peels Citrus spp.
Clary (clary sage) Salvia sclarea L.
Clover Trifolium spp.
Coca (decocainized) Erythroxylum coca Lam. and other spp. of Erythroxylum.
Coffee Coffea spp.
Cola nut Cola acuminata Schott and Endl., and other spp. of Cola.
Coriander Coriandrum sativum L.
Cumin (cummin) Cuminum cyminum L.
Curacao orange peel (orange, bitter peel) Citrus aurantium L.
Cusparia bark Galipea officinalis Hancock.
Dandelion Taraxacum officinale Weber and T. laevigatum DC.
Dandelion root Do.
Dog grass (quackgrass, triticum) Agropyron repens (L.) Beauv.
Elder flowers Sambucus canadensis L. and S. nigra I.
Estragole (esdragol, esdragon, tarragon) Artemisia dracunculus L.
Estragon (tarragon) Do.
Fennel, sweet Foeniculum vulgare Mill.
Fenugreek Trigonella foenum-graecum L.
Galanga (galangal) Alpinia officinarum Hance.
Geranium Pelargonium spp.
Geranium, East Indian Cymbopogon martini Stapf.
Geranium, rose Pelargonium graveolens L'Her.
Ginger Zingiber officinale Rosc.
Grapefruit Citrus paradisi Macf.
Guava Psidium spp.
Hickory bark Carya spp.
Horehound (hoarhound) Marrubium vulgare L.
Hops Humulus lupulus L.
Horsemint Monarda punctata L.
Hyssop Hyssopus officinalis L.
Immortelle Helichrysum augustifolium DC.
Jasmine Jasminum officinale L. and other spp. of Jasminum.
Juniper (berries) Juniperus communis L.
Kola nut Cola acuminata Schott and Endl., and other spp. of Cola.
Laurel berries Laurus nobilis L.
Laurel leaves Laurus spp.
Lavender Lavandula officinalis Chaix.
Lavender, spike Lavandula latifolia Vill.
Lavandin Hybrids between Lavandula officinalis Chaix and Lavandula latifolin Vill.
Lemon Citrus limon (L.) Burm. f.
Lemon balm (see balm)
Lemon grass Cymbopogon citratus DC. and Cymbopogon lexuosus Stapf.
Lemon peel Citrus limon (L.) Burm. f.
Lime Citrus aurantifolia Swingle.
Linden flowers Tilia spp.
Locust bean Ceratonia siliqua L,
Lupulin Humulus lupulus L.
Mace Myristica fragrans Houtt.
Mandarin Citrus reticulata Blanco.
Marjoram, sweet Majorana hortensis Moench.
Mate Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil.
Melissa (see balm)
Menthol Mentha spp.
Menthyl acetate Do.
Molasses (extract) Saccarum officinarum L.
Mustard Brassica spp.
Naringin Citrus paradisi Macf.
Neroli, bigarade Citrus aurantium L.
Nutmeg Myristica fragrans Houtt.
Onion Allium cepa L.
Orange, bitter, flowers Citrus aurantium L.
Orange, bitter, peel Do.
Orange leaf Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck.
Orange, sweet Do.
Orange, sweet, flowers Do.
Orange, sweet, peel Do.
Origanum Origanum spp.
Palmarosa Cymbopogon martini Stapf.
Paprika Capsicum annuum L.
Parsley Petroselinum crispum (Mill.) Mansf.
Pepper, black Piper nigrum L.
Pepper, white Do.
Peppermint Mentha piperita L.
Peruvian balsam Myroxylon pereirae Klotzsch.
Petitgrain Citrus aurantium L.
Petitgrain lemon Citrus limon (L.) Burm. f.
Petitgrain mandarin or tangerine Citrus reticulata Blanco.
Pimenta Pimenta officinalis Lindl.
Pimenta leaf Pimenta officinalis Lindl.
Pipsissewa leaves Chimaphila umbellata Nutt.
Pomegranate Punica granatum L.
Prickly ash bark Xanthoxylum (or Zanthoxylum) Americanum Mill. or Xanthoxylum clava-herculis L.
Rose absolute Rosa alba L., Rosa centifolia L., Rosa damascena Mill., Rosa gallica L., and vars. of these spp.
Rose (otto of roses, attar of roses) Do.
Rose buds Do.
Rose flowers Do.
Rose fruit (hips) Do.
Rose geranium Pelargonium graveolens L'Her.
Rose leaves Rosa spp.
Rosemary Rosmarinus officinalis L.
Saffron Crocus sativus L.
Sage Salvia officinalis L.
Sage, Greek Salvia triloba L.
Sage, Spanish Salvia lavandulaefolia Vahl.
St. John's bread Ceratonia siliqua L.
Savory, summer Satureia hortensis L.
Savory, winter Satureia montana L.
Schinus molle Schinus molle L.
Sloe berries (blackthorn berries) Prunus spinosa L.
Spearmint Mentha spicata L.
Spike lavender Lavandula latifolia Vill.
Tamarind Tamarindus indica L.
Tangerine Citrus reticulata Blanco.
Tarragon Artemisia dracunculus L.
Tea Thea sinensis L.
Thyme Thymus vulgaris L. and Thymus zygis var. gracilis Boiss.
Thyme, white Do.
Thyme, wild or creeping Thymus serpyllum L.
Triticum (see dog grass)
Tuberose Polianthes tuberosa L.
Turmeric Curcuma longa L.
Vanilla Vanilla planifolia Andr. or Vanilla tahitensis J. W. Moore.
Violet flowers Viola odorata L.
Violet leaves Do.
Violet leaves absolute Do.
Wild cherry bark Prunus serotina Ehrh.
Ylang-ylang Cananga odorata Hook. f. and Thoms.
Zedoary bark Curcuma zedoaria Rosc.
Sec. 182.40 Natural extractives (solvent-free) used in conjunction with spices, seasonings, and flavorings.
Natural extractives (solvent-free) used in conjunction with spices, seasonings, and flavorings that are generally recognized as safe for their intended use, within the meaning of section 409 of the Act, are as follows:
Common name Botanical name of plant source
Apricot kernel (persic oil) Prunus armeniaca L.
Peach kernel (persic oil) Prunus persica Sieb. et Zucc.
Peanut stearine Arachis hypogaea L.
Persic oil (see apricot kernel and peach kernel)
Quince seed Cydonia oblonga Miller.
Sec. 182.50 Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts.
Certain other spices, seasonings, essential oils, oleoresins, and natural extracts that are generally recognized as safe for their intended use, within the meaning of section 409 of the Act, are as follows:
Common name Derivation
Ambergris Physeter macrocephalus L.
Castoreum Castor fiber L. and C. canadensis Kuhl.
Civet (zibeth, zibet, zibetum) Civet cats, Viverra civetta Schreber and Viverra zibetha Schreber.
Cognac oil, white and green Ethyl oenanthate, so-called.
Musk (Tonquin musk) Musk deer, Moschus moschiferus L.
Sec. 172.510 Natural flavoring substances and natural substances used in conjunction with flavors.
Natural flavoring substances and natural adjuvants may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions.
(a) They are used in the minimum quantity required to produce their intended physical or technical effect and in accordance with all the principles of good manufacturing practice.
(b) In the appropriate forms (plant parts, fluid and solid extracts, concentrates, absolutes, oils, gums, balsams, resins, oleoresins, waxes, and distillates) they consist of one or more of the following, used alone or in combination with flavoring substances and adjuvants generally recognized as safe in food, previously sanctioned for such use, or regulated in any section of this part.
Common name Scientific name Limitations
Aloe Aloe perryiBaker,A. barbadensisMill.,A. feroxMill., and hybrids of this sp. withA. africanaMill. andA. spicataBaker
Althea root and flowers Althea officinalisL
Amyris (West Indian sandalwood) Amyris balsamiferaL
Angola weed Roccella fuciformisAch In alcoholic beverages only
Arnica flowers Arnica montanaL.,A. fulgensPursh,A. sororiaGreene, orA. cordifoliaHooker Do.
Artemisia (wormwood) Artemisiaspp Finished food thujone free1
Artichoke leaves Cynara scolymusL In alcoholic beverages only
Benzoin resin Styrax benzoinDryander,S. paralleloneurusPerkins,S. tonkinensis(Pierre) Craib ex Hartwich, or other spp. of the SectionAnthostyraxof the genusStyrax
Blackberry bark Rubus,SectionEubatus
Boldus (boldo) leaves Peumus boldusMol Do.
Boronia flowers Boronia megastigmaNees
Bryonia root Bryonia albaL., orB. diociaJacq Do.
Buchu leaves Barosma betulinaBartl. et Wendl.,B. crenulata(L.) Hook. orB. serratifoliaWilld
Buckbean leaves Menyanthes trifoliataL Do.
Cajeput Melaleuca leucadendronL. and otherMelaleucaspp
Calumba root Jateorhiza palmata(Lam.) Miers Do.
Camphor tree Cinnamomum camphora(L.) Nees et Eberm Safrole free
Cascara sagrada Rhamnus purshianaDC
Cassie flowers Acacia farnesiana(L.) Willd
Castor oil Ricinus communisL
Catechu, black Acacia catechuWilld
Cedar, white (aborvitae), leaves and twigs Thuja occidentalisL Finished food thujone free1
Centuary Centaurium umbellatumGilib In alcoholic beverages only
Cherry pits Prunus aviumL. orP. cerasusL Not to exceed 25 p.p.m. prussic acid
Cherry-laurel leaves Prunus laurocerasusL Do.
Chestnut leaves Castanea dentata(Marsh.) Borkh
Chirata Swertia chirataBuch.-Ham In alcoholic beverages only
Cinchona, red, bark Cinchona succirubraPav. or its hybrids In beverages only; not more than 83 p.p.m. total cinchona alkaloids in finished beverage
Cinchona, yellow, bark Cinchona ledgerianaMoens,C. calisayaWedd., or hybrids of these with other spp. ofCinchona. Do.
Copaiba South American spp. ofCopaiferaL
Cork, oak Quercus suberL., orQ. occidentalisF. Gay In alcoholic beverages only
Costmary Chrysanthemum balsamitaL Do.
Costus root Saussurea lappaClarke
Cubeb Piper cubebaL. f
Currant, black, buds and leaves Ribes nigrumL
Damiana leaves Turnera diffusaWilld
Davana Artemisia pallensWall
Dill, Indian Anethum sowaRoxb. (Peucedanum graveolensBenth et Hook.,Anethum graveolensL.)
Dittany (fraxinella) roots Dictamnus albusL Do.
Dittany of Crete Origanum dictamnusL
Dragon's blood (dracorubin) Daemonoropsspp
Elder tree leaves Sambucus nigraL In alcoholic beverages only; not to exceed 25 p.p.m. prussic acid in the flavor
Elecampane rhizome and roots Inula heleniumL In alcoholic beverages only
Elemi Canarium communeL. orC. luzonicumMiq
Erigeron Erigeron canadensisL
Eucalyptus globulus leaves Eucalyptus globulusLabill
Fir ("pine") needles and twigs Abies sibiricaLedeb.,A. albaMill.,A. sachalinesisMasters orA. mayrianaMiyabe et Kudo
Fir, balsam, needles and twigs Abies balsamea(L.) Mill
Galanga, greater Alpinia galangaWilld Do.
Galbanum Ferula galbanifluaBoiss. et Buhse and otherFerulaspp
Gambir (catechu, pale) Uncaria gambirRoxb
Genet flowers Spartium junceumL
Gentian rhizome and roots Gentiana luteaL
Gentian, stemless Gentiana acaulisL Do.
Germander, chamaedrys Teucrium chamaedrysL Do.
Germander, golden Teucrium poliumL Do.
Guaiac Guaiacum officinaleL.,G. santumL.,Bulnesia sarmientiLor
Guarana Paullinia cupanaHBK
Haw, black, bark Viburnum prunifoliumL
Hemlock needles and twigs Tsuga canadensis(L.) Carr. orT. heterophylla(Raf.) Sarg
Hyacinth flowers Hyacinthus orientalisL
Iceland moss Cetraria islandicaAch Do.
Imperatoria Peucedanum ostruthium(L.). Koch (Imperatoria ostruthiumL.)
Iva Achillea moschataJacq Do.
Labdanum Cistusspp
Lemon-verbena Lippia citriodoraHBK Do.
Linaloe wood Bursera delpechianaPoiss. and otherBurseraspp
Linden leaves Tilliaspp Do.
Lovage Levisticum officinaleKoch
Lungmoss (lungwort) Sticta pulmonaceaAch
Maidenhair fern Adiantum capillus-venerisL Do.
Maple, mountain Acer spicatumLam
Mimosa (black wattle) flowers Acacia decurrensWilld. var.dealbata
Mullein flowers Verbascum phlomoidesL. orV. thapsiformeSchrad Do.
Myrrh Commiphora molmolEngl.,C. abyssinica(Berg) Engl., or otherCommiphoraspp
Myrtle leaves Myrtus communisL Do.
Oak, English, wood Quercus roburL Do.
Oak, white, chips Quercus albaL
Oak moss Evernia prunastri(L.) Ach.,E. furfuracea(L.) Mann, and other lichens Finished food thujone free1
Olibanum Boswellia carteriBirdw. and otherBoswelliaspp
Opopanax (bisabolmyrrh) Opopanax chironiumKoch (true opopanax) ofCommiphora erythraeaEngl. var.Llabrescens
Orris root Iris germanicaL. (including its varietyflorentinaDykes) andI. pallidaLam
Pansy Viola tricolorL In alcoholic beverages only
Passion flower Passiflora incarnataL
Patchouly Pogostemon cablinBenth. andP. heyneanusBenth
Peach leaves Prunus persica(L.) Batsch In alcoholic beverages only; not to exceed 25 p.p.m. prussic acid in the flavor
Pennyroyal, American Hedeoma pulegioides(L.) Pers
Pennyroyal, European Mentha pulegiumL
Pine, dwarf, needles and twigs Pinus mugoTurra var.pumilio(Haenke) Zenari
Pine, Scotch, needles and twigs Pinus sylvestrisL
Pine, white, bark Pinus strobusL In alcoholic beverages only
Pine, white oil Pinus palustrisMill., and otherPinusspp
Poplar buds Populus balsamiferaL. (P. tacamahaccaMill.),P. candicansAit., orP. nigraL Do.
Quassia Picrasma excelsa(Sw.) Planch, orQuassia amaraL
Quebracho bark Aspidosperma quebracho-blancoSchlecht, or (Quebrachia lorentzii(Griseb)) Schinopsis lorentzii(Griseb.) Engl.
Quillaia (soapbark) Quillaja saponariaMol
Red saunders (red sandalwood) Pterocarpus san alinusL In alcoholic beverages only
Rhatany root Krameria triandraRuiz et Pav. orK. argenteaMart
Rhubarb, garden root Rheum rhaponticumL Do.
Rhubarb root Rheum officinaleBaill.,R. palmatumL., or other spp. (exceptingR. rhaponticumL.) or hybrids ofRheumgrown in China
Roselle Hibiscus sabdariffaL Do.
Rosin (colophony) Pinus palustrisMill., and otherPinusspp Do.
St. Johnswort leaves, flowers, and caulis Hypericum perforatumL Hypericin-free alcohol distillate form only; in alcoholic beverages only
Sandalwood, white (yellow, or East Indian) Santalum albumL
Sandarac Tetraclinis articulata(Vahl.), Mast In alcoholic beverages only
Sarsaparilla Smilax aristolochiaefoliaMill., (Mexican sarsaparilla),S. regeliiKillip et Morton (Honduras sarsaparilla),S. febrifugaKunth (Ecuadorean sarsaparilla), or undeterminedSmilaxspp. (Ecuadorean or Central American sarsaparilla)
Sassafras leaves Sassafras albidum(Nutt.) Nees Safrole free
Senna, Alexandria Cassia acutifoliaDelile
Serpentaria (Virginia snakeroot) Aristolochia serpentariaL In alcoholic beverages only
Simaruba bark Simaruba amaraAubl Do.
Snakeroot, Canadian (wild ginger) Asarum canadenseL
Spruce needles and twigs Picea glauca(Moench) Voss orP. mariana(Mill.) BSP
Storax (styrax) Liquidambar orientalisMill. orL. styracifluaL
Tagetes (marigold) Tagetes patulaL.,T. erectaL., orT. minutaL. (T. glanduliferaSchrank) As oil only
Tansy Tanacetum vulgareL In alcoholic beverages only; finished alcoholic beverage thujone free1
Thistle, blessed (holy thistle) Onicus benedictusL In alcoholic beverages only
Thymus capitatus(Spanish "origanum") Thymus capitatusHoffmg. et Link
Tolu Myroxylon balsamum(L.) Harms
Turpentine Pinus palustrisMill. and otherPinusspp. which yield terpene oils exclusively
Valerian rhizome and roots Valeriana officinalisL
Veronica Veronica officinalisL Do.
Vervain, European Verbena officinalisL Do.
Vetiver Vetiveria zizanioidesStapf Do.
Violet, Swiss Viola calcarataL
Walnut husks (hulls), leaves, and green nuts Juglans nigraL. orJ. regiaL
Woodruff, sweet Asperula odorataL In alcoholic beverages only
Yarrow Achillea millefoliumL In beverages only; finished beverage thujone free1
Yerba santa Eriodictyon californicum(Hook, et Arn.) Torr
Yucca, Joshua-tree Yucca brevifoliaEngelm
Yucca, Mohave Yucca schidigeraRoezl ex Ortgies (Y. mohavensisSarg.)

This is alot of crap to describe 1 ingredient! After several days researching each ingredient I didn't find anything on these lists that would be perceived as gluten, but if your still not convinced then be careful. Some folks say stay away from natural flavor as it contains gluten, but if the manufacturer is following the FDA rules natural flavor does not contain gluten. If you disagree, I would love to hear your feedback.

Happy eating, learning and living! Gluten Free...

September 18, 2013

Gluten Free = less than 20ppm

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According to the FDA if a product is labeled Gluten Free it can potentially contain 20ppm or less per serving of gluten. So you know that entire bag of potato chips you just ate which states it has 3 servings in it? Ya that one, right? You just potentially ate 60ppm of gluten just then. This 20ppm is per serving, not per bag. Makes you think differently about eating a bag of chips or anything else with more than one serving. Imagine that tiny bag of pretzels that says there are 3 small pretzels to a serving and you just ate the whole bag with 30 small pretzels... 100ppm of gluten... AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!

I found this useful information below on some site (I don't remember. I think I did a Google search to find it). Click here to see the original document, otherwise you can read below.

FDA RELEASES FINAL RULE ON “GLUTEN-FREE” LABELING OF FOODS 
 
On August 2, 2013, FDA released a long-awaited final rule explaining when a company may voluntarily label a food “gluten-free.”1 FDA promulgated the final rule pursuant to the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004’s (FALCPA’s) directive that FDA define and permit the use of the term “gluten-free” on food labels. The agency issued a proposed rule in January 2007 and subsequently reopened the comment period in August 2011. The final rule contains many of the same provisions as the proposed rule, but with a few notable distinctions, detailed below.

The final rule is intended to benefit the approximately 3 million Americans with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine for which the only treatment is adherence to a gluten-free diet. It establishes a national, uniform standard for the use of “gluten-free” claims in food labeling. If manufacturers choose to make “gluten-free” labeling claims, they must comply with the requirements of the final rule beginning August 5, 2014, although FDA anticipates that manufacturers may choose to follow the requirements as soon as possible.

REQUIREMENTS FOR “GLUTEN-FREECLAIMS
 
The final rule defines the term “gluten” to mean “the proteins that naturally occur in a gluten-containing grain and that may cause adverse health effects in persons with celiac disease (e.g., prolamins and glutelins).”
 The term “gluten-containing grain” is defined as wheat (meaning any species belonging to the genus Triticum), rye (meaning any species belonging to the genus Secale), barley (meaning any species belonging to the genus Hordeum), and any crossbred hybrid of these grains.

Under the final rule, a “gluten-free” food labeling claim can be made only if both of the following requirements are met:

1. The food is either (a) inherently free of gluten; or (b) does not contain any of the following ingredients:
  • An ingredient that is a gluten-containing grain. (Examples include wheat, barley, rye, spelt wheat, and triticale.)
  • An ingredient that is derived from a gluten-containing grain and has not been processed to remove gluten. (Examples include wheat flour, semolina, and farina.)
  • An ingredient that is derived from a gluten-containing grain and has been processed to remove gluten, if the use of that ingredient results in 20 parts per million (ppm) or more gluten in the food. (Examples include wheat starch and modified food starch.)
2. Any unavoidable presence of gluten in the food is below 20 ppm.

KEY ASPECTS OF THE FINAL RULE 
 
There are three synonyms for “gluten-free”:  FDA considers the labeling claims “no gluten,” “free of gluten,” and “without gluten” to be equivalent to a “gluten-free” claim. A food that bears any of these claims must also meet the final rule’s requirements.

The rule retains the proposed less than 20 ppm gluten standard: The proposed rule set forth a less than 20 ppm gluten standard for “gluten-free” labeling claims because, as FDA explained, available gluten detection methods could only reliably and consistently detect gluten at 20 ppm or above. FDA subsequently conducted a gluten safety assessment and concluded that the estimated level of concern for individuals with celiac disease ranges from 0.01 to 0.06 ppm gluten, but that these numbers represent “a conservative, highly uncertain estimation of risk.” Currently available analytical methods, the ease of enforcement, and the fact that “lowering the gluten level below 20 ppm [would] make it far more difficult for manufacturers to make food products that could be labeled as ‘gluten-free’” influenced FDA’s decision to adopt a less than 20 ppm gluten standard in the final rule.

Oats are not considered to be a “gluten-containing grain”: As in the proposed rule, the final rule does not include oats in the definition of a “gluten-containing grain.” Thus, oats can be used as an ingredient in a food labeled as “gluten-free,” so long as the oats contain less than 20 ppm gluten. In the preamble, FDA explains that the commingling of oats with gluten-containing grains is preventable and that “for most individuals with celiac disease, oats can add whole grain options, nutrient enrichment, and dietary variety.” Even so, to help individuals with celiac disease who cannot tolerate oats, FDA encourages “manufacturers of foods labeled ‘gluten-free’ that use an oat-derived ingredient where the word ‘oat’ does not appear in the ingredient list . . . to indicate in their labeling that an oat-derived ingredient is present.”

Claims are not allowed for food that has less than 20 ppm gluten but contains a “gluten-containing grain”: Consistent with the proposed rule, the final rule does not allow a “gluten-free” claim on food made with small amounts of a gluten-containing grain or ingredients derived from such grains that were not processed to remove gluten, even if the food product itself contains less than 20 ppm gluten. This requirement “helps ensure that the finished product has the lowest amount of gluten that is reasonably possible.”

There are no format requirements: The final rule does not impose requirements related to format, the use of symbols, or the use of third-party certification logos for “gluten-free” claims. Manufacturers may choose where to place a “gluten-free” claim on a food label, provided that all applicable legal requirements are met. Manufacturers also may use a third-party certification logo to indicate that a product is free of gluten, provided that its use is truthful and not misleading.

The rule applies only to FDA-regulated foods: The final rule applies to all FDA-regulated foods, including dietary supplements and imported foods. It does not apply to drugs or cosmetics, or to foods regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) (meat, poultry, and egg products) or by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) (alcoholic beverages).

SIGNIFICANT CHANGES FROM THE PROPOSED RULE 
 
Additional language is required on foods containing wheat: In the preamble, FDA agreed with several comments that noted that consumers would receive a confusing message if foods bear a “gluten-free” claim and also contain wheat as an ingredient. The final rule addresses this concern by requiring foods that bear a “gluten-free” claim and also include wheat as an ingredient to add after the term “wheat” an asterisk linked to this nearby statement: “The wheat has been processed to allow this food to meet the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requirements for gluten-free foods.”

No qualifying language is required for claims on inherently gluten-free foods: The proposed rule provided that foods that do not inherently contain gluten that bear a “gluten-free” claim must state that all foods of the same type are inherently gluten-free (e.g., “all milk is gluten-free”). Many comments noted that the proposed qualifying language would cause consumer confusion, as not all versions of a product may be gluten-free. FDA agreed and concluded that a “gluten-free” claim on a food that is inherently gluten-free, without qualifying language, is not misleading.

Analytical testing is not necessarily required: In the preamble, FDA clarifies that the final rule does not require manufacturers to conduct analytical testing to determine that their products bearing “gluten-free” claims contain less than 20 ppm. Manufacturers may develop their own methods that best suit their particular needs to determine the gluten content of their products. For instance, manufacturers may use quality control tools, such as requesting certificates of gluten analysis from ingredient suppliers.

The rule preempts state law: A state may not establish a requirement that is different from the rule’s requirements for the use of a “gluten-free” claim. The rule is not intended to preempt other state requirements with respect to statements about gluten, such as information about how the food was processed.

FUTURE ACTION 
 
The agency may reevaluate the 20 ppm standard as new information becomes available. FDA plans to issue a proposed rule to address how it will assess compliance with this final rule with respect to fermented or hydrolyzed foods or ingredients, for which there are no scientifically valid methods for detecting intact gluten proteins. Also, FDA intends to work with USDA and TTB on the issue of gluten-free food labeling to harmonize requirements for food products regulated by these agencies, where possible.

LEGAL RISK MANAGEMENT ISSUES 
 
Failure of a product labeled “gluten-free” to comply with the new gluten-free standard would cause the product to be deemed misbranded. FDA intends to enforce the gluten-free standard through firm inspections, examination of imports, label reviews, and analytical testing of food samples. This labeling standard likely will be cited as the standard by which “gluten-free” claims by restaurants should be evaluated. In addition, this rule could have regulatory compliance and product liability implications for promotional claims made not only in labeling, but for advertising and promotions more generally under both the Federal Trade Commission Act and state consumer protection statutes.

Happy eating, learning and living! Gluten Free... (after this... my goodness! More like be careful eating, learning and living Gluten Free)

Gluten Free Bread

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Its been a while since I last posted. I'm always on the lookout for new and exciting products, but I don't like to post unless they have my attention. Udi's year after year gets props for their gluten free bread but I think its the nastiest gluten free bread available. Its only okay if you like to eat cardboard both in texture and taste. I'm talking about bread folks, not toast. Even if we were talking toast, Udi's is still really NASTY!

My attention over the last year has been on Canyon Bakehouse. My awesome mom was at Sprouts and brought 2 loafs (is that how you spell it?) for me to try, the Cinnamon Raisin and the Mountain White (of course I like to eat the Mountain White it was named after my husband... tee hee). At first I thought it was going to be like every other nasty bread that needed to be toasted, buttered and jammed before it was edible. I held my breath, but had to give it "the first bite without toasting" test. To my surprise my mouth was met with happiness! The Mountain White was fresh, moist, and had flavor. FLAVOR people, not the flavor of cardboard but a REAL bread flavor! A flavor I thought I would never taste again, daily, unless I went to La Farfalla Cafe (in Escondido, CA) daily to have Terri's delicious gluten free fantastic, wonderful, flavorful, moist, happy bread. My mouth had the same reaction with the cinnamon raisin too! Remember folks, I didn't toast these breads, there was no need they were that good.

Just for the record, I don't like slamming other companies and their products, but I have over the past several years tried other manufacturers. I just try not to post about them if I am SUPER dissatisfied.

I have tried the following...

  • Kinikkinik
  • Rudi's
  • Dr. Schar
  • GNI
  • Udi's
  • Food for Life
  • EnerG
  • Glutino

Okay back to Canyon Bakehouse! Shelf life... NO NEED to keep in the fridge or freezer. I go through a loaf a week and don't freeze or refrigerate. The moisture and fabulousness is nicely kept in that week. After a week you will need to refrigerate so it doesn't get moldy.

Last, I want to comment on breakage. You notice when you use a gluten free bread for a sandwich it breaks into small pieces. You put mayonnaise on it or mustard it crumbles? Use Canyon Bakehouse within the first week and you wont get breakage. I cant say enough good things! Go out and try it PLEASE! I live in San Diego and find it at Sprouts.

Ok one last thing... why the hell do all these celebrities support crap like Udi's? Oh... they get paid! Screw what celebrities say and listen to us small folks who blog about being gluten free. You can trust a celebrity as much as I trust my dog not to touch my egg sandwich if I put it in his bowl :)

Happy eating, learning and living! Gluten Free...

What is Celiac Disease?

Celiac disease is a disease of the small intestine. The small intestine is a 22 foot long tube that begins at the stomach and ends at the large intestine (colon). The first 1-1/2 feet of the small intestine (the part that is attached to the stomach) is called the duodenum, the middle part is called the jejunum, and the last part (the part that is attached to the colon) is called the ileum. Food empties from the stomach into the small intestine where it is digested and absorbed into the body. While food is being digested and absorbed, it is transported by the small intestine to the colon. What enters the colon is primarily undigested food. In celiac disease, there is an immunological (allergic) reaction within the inner lining of the small intestine to (gluten) that are present in wheat, rye, barley and, to a lesser extent, in oats. The immunological reaction causes inflammation that destroys the lining of the small intestine. This reduces the absorption of dietary nutrients and can lead to symptoms and signs of nutritional, vitamin, and mineral deficiencies.

I found this information at the link below.
http://www.medicinenet.com/celiac_disease/article.htm

BTW I dont claim to be an expert or doctor. This is information I have found or what has worked for me.